Much speculation has surrounded the outing of Mary McCarthy, the CIA rogue who has been the "deep throat" for the media on everything from the CIA prison's story to yet to be determine other acts of espionage, and whether or not she was found out by "random" polygraphs or as a part of a sting.

The fact is that she did fail polygraphs AFTER her "loose lips" activity was tipped to investigators. Interesting things happen when you put on the "full court press", somebody sqawks.

Rick Moran's theory is a good one in that in these types of investigations the "plastic cheese" is planted to draw the rat or rats. I can tell you that was a part of the strategy, but Mary's discovery definitely came as a part of a tip, most likely on the promise of immunity, which I find most intriguing and amusing. Imagine a mole on the inside who is now spilling the beans on those leakers - such as Mary - who have been leaking stories over the last three years. Its going to be fun to watch the rats devour one another to save their own hides.

As we all know - or should know - since before and especially during the 2004 election cycle leaks were coming out at a fast and furious pace. It was if the State Department and the CIA had suddenly become a 24 hour news service, leaking information specifically designed to undermine the Bush administration, the war effort, and ulitmately was intended to defeat the President's reelection effort.

We now know that McCarthy was a hire of Sandy Burglar, a Clintonista, and a heavy contributor to failed Presidential candidate John Kerry. In addition she worked out of the IG's office of the CIA who would have directly worked on the referral to the JD of the Valerie Plame Game. As the Agency is a small sorority, I immediately wonder just how close she was and is to Valerie Plame.

As I noted from the beginning of the Plame Game, the story was never about Joe Wilson's boondoggle to Niger per-se, but about an elaborate coup by a group of rogue ops to undermine the President of the United States in war time. This is much more than just the leak of CIA prisons - a story which in itself is false, but about the oldest type of war waged and which the CIA is expert at. That being toppling Governments by misinformation propaganda designed to sow discord among the people. Thus the Plame Game was and continues to be a ruse - a paper tiger- a fact that Fitzgerald and his bungling prosecution continually reminds us of.

The MSM is predictably trying to throw cold water on this new story as AJ Strata comments on the NY Times take. But the pure and simple fact is as I told you this is going to be a vindicating summer for supporters of the Bush Administration.

Also in spite of what the WAPO editorial board thinksabout it's supposed right to print classified information, the JD is specifically aiming at them and more specifically reporters who have printed that information. McCarthy has been gabbing it up quite a bit over the years and no doubt will turn on her "friends and contacts" to avoid the slammer.

For those who have wondered why this administration never seems to "fight back", that is now effectually over.

The game is on.

UPDATE: Per AJ, some of Mary's co-horts are coming out for her defense. Namely, Robert David Steel Vivas, former Jarhead op know it all. This is the dope is simply another disgruntled former employee who wants among other nutbag ideas to use computer hackers to improve our intelligence gathering capabilities. Yah! Waiting on the Mother Ship.

He also co-signed this letter to Senator John (Please don't hurt the terrorists) McCain, along with others familiar to us all.

"The Honorable John S. McCain
United States Senate
Washington D.C. 20510

Dear Senator McCain:

We write to express our strong support for your amendment to the Defense Appropriations billreinforcing the ban on cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment by all US personnel around the world.

As retired professional intelligence experts and interrogators, we understand how vital accurate intelligence is to US efforts to combat terrorist violence by groups like Al Qaeda.

We have seen first-hand the central role that human intelligence gathering has played in countering the threats posed by these radical groups operating in the Middle East, South Asia, and other regions, as well as here at home.

We are proud to have served our country, and we remain deeply committed to supporting efforts to confront the serious terrorist threats facing the nation.

In our view, the use of torture and other cruelty against those in US custody undermines this fight. Such tactics fail to produce reliable information, risk corrupting the institutions that employ them, and forfeit the ideals that attract others to our nation’s cause.

In the public debate over your amendment, some have argued that CIA interrogators should be exempt from the standards of decency and law that guide the actions of our military in battle and reflect our national values. They argue that the US must retain “flexibility” to act outside accepted standards in dealing with hardened enemies, on the presumption that violent and abusive tactics are the best way to successfully interrogate these prisoners. We reject this view.

Carving out authority for the CIA to abuse prisoners in its custody does a disservice to those brave men and women who serve the agency, and increases the risks to their safety in an already dangerous environment.

In addition, it is wrong to assume that abusive treatment can be contained within a bureaucracy without corrupting the institution itself. Even where the intention is to limit abusive treatment to only a narrow category of prisoners or circumstances, other governments that have experimented with such “controlled abuse” have found that employment of violent tactics invariably spreads, becoming more the norm than the exception. There are already signs this is happening in our own interrogation practices, with devastating impact to our nation’s reputation.

Those who press for the “flexibility” to abuse prisoners have been willing to forsake both effectiveness and our values as a nation on the misguided belief that abusive treatment will produce vital intelligence. But interrogation in the real world rarely resembles what we see on television or in the movies.

Serious efforts to extract intelligence from captured prisoners are not the stuff of television drama. This task requires research, native language skills, and developing sustained relationships with the targets of interrogation. Abusive tactics make developing these relationships more difficult; instead, they tend to induce a subject to tell an interrogator whatever he or she thinks the interrogator wants to hear. Once these barriers are built up, opportunities for obtaining reliable information from a target usually all but disappear, and vital information is permanently lost.

Thankfully, the choice between our values and success against the terrorist enemy is a false one. We must not be seduced by the fiction that adherence to our ideals is what stands between our great nation and the security it deserves. As the President has often repeated, success in the struggle against terrorism requires a firm moral purpose. In this, our values and our national security are aligned. We support your amendment to restore clarity and honor to US interrogation policy. Much depends on the success of your effort.

Sincerely,

ROBERT BAER, former Case Officer, Directorate of Operations, CIA

VINCENT CANNISTRARO, former director of the CIA Counterterrorism Center

KATHLEEN CHRISTISON, former Analyst, Directorate of Intelligence, CIA

WILLIAM CHRISTISON, former National Intelligence Officer and Director, Office of Regional & Political
Analysis, CIA

RICHARD CLARKE, former advisor, National Security Council

RAY CLOSE, former Chief of Station Officer, CIA

VICKI DIVOLL, former Assistant General Counsel, CIA

GRAHAM FULLER, former Vice-Chairman of the National Intelligence Council, CIA

MELVIN A. GOODMAN, former Analyst, Directorate of Intelligence, CIA

PHILIP GIRALDI, former Case Officer, Directorate of Operations, CIA

MICHAEL GRIMALDI, former Analyst, Directorate of Intelligence, CIA

RALPH M. HOCKLEY, Col. USA (ret), former intelligence officer

ARTHUR S. HULNICK, former intelligence officer, US Air Force, former CIA

LARRY C. JOHNSON, former Analyst, Directorate of Intelligence, CIA

EDWARD R. M. KANE, former Chief of Station, CIA

CAMERON LA CLAIR, former Executive Officer of Area Division, CIA

W. PATRICK LANG, Col. USA (ret), Chief of DIA Middle East Division, Director Defense Humint
Services

LYNNE A. LARKIN, former Case Officer, Directorate of Operations, CIA

DAVID MACMICHAEL, former National Intelligence Council officer, CIA

TOM MAERTENS, former analyst, Intelligence and Research, Department of State

EUGENE A. MANNING, former Analyst, Office of National Estimates, Directorate of Intelligence, and
Counterintelligence Center, CIA

JAMES MARCINKOWSKI, former Case Officer, Directorate of Operations, CIA

JOHN E. MARSH, former Case Officer, Directorate of Operations, CIA

RICHARD MCDERMOTT, former Army Counterintelligence Special Agent

RAY MCGOVERN, former Analyst, Directorate of Intelligence, CIA

DAVID RUPP, former Case Officer, Directorate of Operations, CIA

GARETH A. SHELLMAN, former intelligence analyst, U.S. Army Security Agency

JOHN P. SONTAG, former intelligence analyst, CIA and Department of State

LEWIS R. SORLEY, former Director, National Intelligence Emergency Support Office, CIA

ROBERT DAVID STEELE VIVAS, former clandestine officer, CIA

STANSFIELD TURNER, former Director of Central Intelligence

AMB. (RET) PHILIP C. WILCOX, JR., former Ambassador at Large for Counter Terrorism at Department
of State

AUSTIN YAMADA, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Combating
Terrorism"


Consider the source. Mary was and is a member of this group. Get the picture?

UPDATE II: Just to dispell the guessing, Mary's leak specific to the CIA prisons story was operational, which is egregious and put in field operatives in danger. She will most likely be prosecuted. She is also being looked at as a possible suspect in the leaking of information for several other NY Times stories and WAPO stories based on leaks. Most specifically Risen and Lichtblau story on surveillance.

She is a dangerous person, a traitor and it's good she's off the beat.

Word is that nabbing her is a hugh bust to be likened with the most notorious of recent treason cases.

More info on Mary Loose Lips (new coined term), she was key to the "No WMD" stance of some the IC, which seems to be the reoccurring thread of discontent with the Bush Administration (Clarke whom she worked under, Valerie Plame, among others).

UPDATE III: Michelle Malkin with a update reference the connections between Mary and Valerie Plame. More on that to come.

UPDATE IV: Let's dispel another misnomer in that the MSM is presenting Mary loose lips as 'just an ordinary operative', when in fact under The Agency organizational chart, the office of Inspector general answers directly to the DCI. Trust me, this is huge and she isn't going to roll alone.

****Further on above...., from the Job Description: "The Office of Inspector General (OIG) promotes efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability in the administration of Agency activities. OIG also seeks to prevent and detect fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement. The Inspector General is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The Inspector General, whose activities are independent of those of any other component in the Agency, reports directly to the D/CIA. OIG conducts inspections, investigations, and audits at Headquarters and in the field, and oversees the Agency-wide grievance-handling system. The OIG provides a semiannual report to the D/CIA which the Director is required to submit by law to the Intelligence Committees of Congress within 30 days."

The higher they go, the harder they fall....





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