In investigating the web which is the Plame Game there are several facets, and if one tried to cover them all it would be nearly impossible.

Which is why I've concentrated on the CIA/Roque ops/Joe's a loser/angle, and have let Tom Mcguire, AJ Strata and others handle the questions about the journalists involved. But every once and a while the two meet head on.

Reading TM today, I came across this Nicolas Kristof quote from his June 13, 2003 OPED:

"Condoleezza Rice was asked on "Meet the Press" on Sunday about a column of mine from May 6 regarding President Bush's reliance on forged documents to claim that Iraq had sought uranium in Africa. That was not just a case of hyping intelligence, but of asserting something that had already been flatly discredited by an envoy investigating at the behest of the office of Vice President Dick Cheney."

Now, in the last two years I have have read thousands of documents related to this case, some of which are "eyes only" and not available for public consumption. Yet I thought I had seen this verbage before. So searched it and viola! In one of the VIPS so-called memorandums to the President is this wording:

"There is just too much evidence that Ambassador Wilson was sent to Niger at the behest of Vice President Cheney’s office, and that Wilson’s findings were duly reported not only to that office but to others as well."

Ok, maybe I'm batty from all the reading, but note that the language, tone, adjectives, verbs, layout of both the Kristof piece and the VIPS memorandum seem as though they both came from the same set of talking points? "Behest"? How many people knew that word before they saw either article?

To me the similarities are unmistakable.

Then as I mused over that, there is this paragraph I caught before, but that I'd always found interesting, but now has even more meaning to me, showing almost as if Kristof's article had a sort of designed intention to it.

VIPS: "...former ambassador Joseph Wilson’s mission to Niger in February 2002, when he determined that the Iraq-Niger report was a con-job. Wilson’s findings were duly reported to all concerned in early March 2002. And, if she somehow missed that report, the New York Times’ Nicholas Kristoff on May 6 recounted chapter and verse on Wilson’s mission, and the story remained the talk of the town in the weeks that followed."

"Chapter and verse".

You've got that right because this story flows just like a script.

This has spike my interest, I wonder how many other 'comparisons' between 'source' and 'writer' I can find?








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